TatukGIS – Generic ESRI with a Bit Extra


Fig1 basic TatukGIS Internet Server view element and legend/layer element

TatukGIS is a commercial product that is basically a generic brand for building GIS interfaces including web interfaces. It is developed in Gdynia Poland:


The core product is a Developer Kernel, DK, which provides basic building blocks for GIS applications in a variety of Microsoft flavors including:

  • DK-ActiveX – An ActiveX® (OCX) control supporting Visual Basic, VB.NET, C#, Visual C++
  • DK.NET – A manageable .NET WinForms component supporting C# and VB.NET
  • DK-CF – A manageable .NET Compact Framework 2.0/3.5 component – Pocket PC 2002 and 2003, Windows Mobile 5 and 6, Windows CE.NET 4.2, Windows CE 5 and 6
  • DK-VCL – A native Borland®/CodeGear® Delphi™/C++ Builder™

These core components have been leveraged for some additional products to make life a good deal easier for web and PDA developers. A TatukGIS Internet Server single server deployment license starts at $590 for the Lite Edition or $2000 per deployment server for the full edition in a web environment. I guess this is a good deal compared to ESRI/Oracle licenses, but not especially appealing to the open source integrators among us. There is support for the whole gamut of CAD, GIS, and raster formats as well as project file support for ESRI and MapInfo. This is a very complete toolkit.

The TatukGIS Internet Server license supports database access to all the usual DBs: "MSSQL Server, MySQL, Interbase, DB2, Oracle, Firebird, Advantage, PostgreSQL… " However, support for spatial formats are currently only available for Oracle Spatial/Locator and ArcSDE. Support for PostGIS and MS SQL Server spatial extensions are slated for release with TatukGIS IS 9.0.

I wanted to experiment a bit with the Internet Server, so I downloaded a trial version(free)..

Documentation was somewhat sparse, but this was a trial download. I found the most help looking in the sample subdirectories. Unfortunately these were all VB and it took a bit of experimental playing to translate into C#. The DK trial download did include a pdf document that was also somewhat helpful. Perhaps a real development license and/or server deployment license would provide better C# .NET documentation. I gather the historical precedence of VB is still evident in the current doc files.

The ESRI influence is obvious. From layer control to project serialization, it seems to follow the ESRI look and feel. This can be a plus or a minus. Although very familiar to a large audience of users, I am afraid the ESRI influence is not aesthetically pleasing or very smooth. I was able to improve over the typically clunky ArcIMS type zoom and wait interface by switching to the included Flash wrapper (simply a matter of setting Flash="true").

The ubiquitous flash plugin lets the user experience a somewhat slippy map interface familiar to users of Virtual Earth and Google Maps. We are still not talking a DeepZoom or Google Earth type interface, but a very functional viewer for a private data source. I was very pleased to find how easy it was to build the required functionality including vector and .sid overlays with layer/legend manipulation.

This is a very simple to use toolkit. If you have had any experience with Google Map API or Virtual Earth it is quite similar. Once a view element is added to your aspx the basic map interface is added server side:

<ttkGIS:XGIS_ViewerIS id="GIS" onclick=”GIS_Click" runat="server" OnPaint="GIS_Paint" Width="800px" Height="600px" OnLoad="GIS_Load" BorderColor="Black" BorderWidth="1px" ImageType="PNG24" Flash="True"></ttkGIS:XGIS_ViewerIS>

The balance of the functionality is a matter of adding event code to the XGIS_ViewerIS element. For example :

    protected void GIS_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
       GIS.Open( Page.MapPath( "data/lasanimas1.ttkgp" ) );
       GIS.SetParameters("btnFullExtent.Pos", "(10,10)");
       GIS.SetParameters("btnZoom.Pos", "(40,10)");
       GIS.SetParameters("btnZoomEx.Pos", "(70,10)");
       GIS.SetParameters("btnDrag.Pos", "(100,10)");
       GIS.SetParameters("btnSelect.Pos", "(130,10)");

       addresslayer = (XGIS_LayerVector)GIS.API.Get("addpoints19");
    }

The ttkgp project support allows addition of a full legend/layer menu with a single element, an amazing time saver:

<ttkGIS:XGIS_LegendIS id="Legend" runat="server" Width="150px" Height="600px" ImageType="PNG24" BackColor="LightYellow" OnLoad="Legend_Load" AllowMove="True" BorderWidth="1px"></ttkGIS:XGIS_LegendIS>

The result is a simple functional project viewer available over the internet, complete with zoom, pan, and layer manipulation. The real power of the TatukGIS is in the multitude of functions that can be used to extend these basics. I added a simple address finder and PDF print function, but there are numerous functions for routing, buffering, geocoding, projection, geometry relations etc. I was barely able to scratch the surface with my experiments.


Fig2 – TatukGIS Internet Server browser view with .sid imagery and vector overlays

The Bit Extra:
As a bit of a plus the resulting aspx is quite responsive. Because the library is not built with the MS MFC it has a performance advantage over the ESRI products it replaces. The TatukGIS website claims include the following:

"DK runs some operations run even 5 – 50 times faster than the leading GIS development products"

I wasn’t able to verify this, but I was pleased with the responsiveness of the interface, especially in light of the ease of development. I believe clients with proprietary data layers who need a quick website would be very willing to license the TatukGIS Internet Server. Even though an open source stack such as PostGIS, Geoserver, OpenLayers could do many of the same things, the additional cost of development would pretty much offset the TatukGIS license cost.

The one very noticeable restriction is that development is a Windows only affair. You will need an ASP IIS server to make use of the TatukGIS for development and deployment. Of course clients can use any of the popular browsers from any of the common OS platforms. Cloud clusters in Amazon’s AWS will not support TatukGIS IS very easily, but now that GoGrid offers Virtual Windows servers there are options.


Fig3 – TatukGIS Internet Server browser view with DRG imagery and vector overlays

Fig4 – TatukGIS Internet Server browser result from a find address function

Summary: TatukGIS Internet Server is a good toolkit for custom development, especially for clients with ESRI resources. The license is quite reasonable.

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